Second Level

SHAPES, AREAS AND VOLUMES

SUBJECTS STUDIED AT SCHOOL

FURTHER EDUCATION:

Masters of Structural Engineering with Architecture

Maths

Graphic Communication

Technical Studies

MEET MARCUS

Civil Engineer, AECOM

Physics

Art

English

History

CAREER JOURNEY SO FAR

Joined AECOM in 2017 and have worked within the Railway Structures team from Graduate Engineer to Civil Engineer.

Has worked on a number of different structures, including footbridges at stations, large viaduct structures.

Experience in other fields like ancillary railway engineering aspects like cable troughing and building foundations.

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FUTURE ASPIRATIONS

To become a Chartered Engineer (maybe by the end of 2022) and be promoted to Senior Engineer. Once chartered, potentially leaving AECOM to explore different aspects of engineering.

Q&A WITH MARCUS

What does your company/organisation do?

Worldwide multi-disciplinary engineering design consultancy.

What types of activities do you do in your job?

Mostly office based design work with the occasional visits to site to perform condition surveys of structures to assist designs

What does a typical day at work look like for you?

Going to an office and interacting with my colleagues to create high quality design submissions, including sitting in a number of different meetings (some with clients but most with other colleagues).

Rarely get the opportunity to visit a structure in hi-vis clothing to check the condition to assist in either repairs or replacement of the structure.

What are your favourite things about your job?

Most people would say the vast wealth of experience etc.

I would have to say the interactions between people which helps create a better working environment which has sadly been lost slightly due to working from home etc.

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HOW MARCUS USES SHAPES, AREAS AND VOLUMES AT WORK

When designing structures, there are times when I have to compare outputs from computer software with that of hand calculations.


For example I have to calculate the volume of steelwork within a steel footbridge, which allows me to calculate the weight of the structure using the density of steel. Once this has been completed, by comparing the values by hand against the weight suggested in the computer software, I am able to confirm that the software is correct before continuing with the design

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ACTIVITIES

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Question 1

Using the dimensions above, which are in milimetres, determine the area of the above shapes. These are actual steel elements used in buildings/bridges. 

Question 2

If both members are 6 metres long, what are the volumes of the members in mm3? Hint: There are 1000mm in a metre.

Question 3

From the above volumes calculated, what are the volumes in mm3? Hint: There are 1000mm in a metre, so there are 1,000,000,000 mm3 in a m3.

Question 4

The density of steel is 7000kg/m3 - what is the weight of the members? Hint: Multiply the volume in m3 by the density.

Question 5

If you're only allowed to order a maximum of 10 members and you have to order a minimum 1 no. of each, how many members would be required to have over 1 tonne of steel? Hint: 1 tonne = 1000kg.